2022 Apr 8 Consciousness Talks 2: Phenomenology and Quantum Cognition by Bruza and Taguchi

Time: 15:00 (AEST) Peter Bruza, Queensland University of Technology, Australia Title: “Quantum-like Contextuality in Cognition and what it might mean for the Philosophy of Mind” Abstract: Contextuality is an intriguing concept that has been explored within quantum foundations for decades.…

2022 Apr 8 Consciousness Talks 2: Phenomenology and Quantum Cognition by Bruza and Taguchi

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Time: 15:00 (AEST)

Peter Bruza, Queensland University of Technology, Australia
Title: “Quantum-like Contextuality in Cognition and what it might mean for the Philosophy of Mind”
Abstract:
Contextuality is an intriguing concept that has been explored within quantum foundations for decades. Within the field of quantum cognition there has been speculation for some time that quantum-like contextuality may be present in human cognition. This talk with introduce quantum-like contextuality and position it within Plotnitsky’s philosophy of “Reality-without-realism” in order to present some implications of the Philosophy of Mind. Speculative connections will be made with enactive cognitions and C.S. Peirce’s latter views on continuity.

Bio: Professor at the Faculty of Science, Queensland University of Technology. His areas of interest include quantum cognition, enactive cognition, applied logic and phenomenology.

Shigeru Taguchi, Hokkaido University, Japan
Title: Mediation and Contextuality: Rethinking the concept of consciousness

Abstract:
We commonly think of consciousness as a kind of “container” for mental content. However, this view may be an obstacle to a proper approach to consciousness. I propose that the “container model” of consciousness be replaced by a “mediation model.” Consciousness is an expression of the mutual mediation between our bodies and the world. This is an example of universal contextuality. What happens in the body depends on the world as its context, and how the world appears depends on the actual state of the body. I will describe consciousness based on this “twisted loop” structure shaped by the body and the world.

Bio:
Professor at the Faculty of Humanities and Human Sciences / the director of the Center for Human Nature, Artificial Intelligence, and Neuroscience (CHAIN), Hokkaido University. His areas of interest include phenomenology, philosophy of consciousness, and Japanese philosophy, with particular emphasis on collaborative research with neuroscientists, cognitive scientists, roboticists, and mathematicians.

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